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Aberdeenshire Travel Guide and Information.

Travel Guide :: Scotland :: North East Scotland :: Aberdeenshire

Aberdeenshire Travel Guide

Places to Visit in Aberdeenshire

Ballater

Ballater

Situated in the area known as Royal Deeside, Ballater is just 8 miles from Balmoral. This one time spa town now celebrates its strong connection to Queen Victoria and provides a superb base for walking and the pursuit of other outdoor activities in the Cairngorm mountains.

7 out of 10 stars (2 votes)
Braemar

Braemar

The unofficial capital of Royal Deeside, Braemar is most famous for its highland games which are one of the most popular gatherings of its kind. Braemar is ideally situated in an area teeming with wildlife and is an excellent destination for walking, skiing and the pursuit of outdoor activities.

9 out of 10 stars (2 votes)
Crovie

Crovie

A wee conservation village huddling precariously close to the sea, Crovie consists of some 40 houses. Too small even for cars, Crovie consists of a single street and is an ideal choice for those who have dreamed of falling to sleep while listening to the sound of the waves lapping against the shore.

9 out of 10 stars (12 votes)
Ellon

Ellon

Situated fifteen miles north of Aberdeen, Ellon is a picturesque town on the River Ythan. Essentially a dormitory town for Aberdeen, Ellon also makes a good base for angling. Sights to see in Ellon include the old bridge, Moot Hill Monument and Ellon Castle. Attractions in the vicinity include Pitmedden Garden, Haddo House and Tolquhon Castle.

9 out of 10 stars (3 votes)
Fraserburgh

Fraserburgh

Known to locals as the "Broch", Fraserburgh lies some 48 miles north of Aberdeen and 18 miles north of her sister fishing port at Peterhead. One of the main fishing ports in Scotland in Scotland, Fraserburgh's main attraction is Kinnaird Lighthouse built by Stevenson. Fraserburgh is also a good destination for birdwatchers, golfers, walkers, surfers and divers

6 out of 10 stars (5 votes)
Gardenstown

Gardenstown

Gardenstown like its neighbours Pennan and Crovie is a wee coastal village situated precariously close to the water. The little village provides the perfect place to relax in picturesque surrounds.

9 out of 10 stars (3 votes)
Huntly

Huntly

Situated in an area commonly known as Speyside, Huntly lies close to the Whisky Trail. Although there are no distilleries in the town itself, Huntly boasts the fine ruins of Huntly Castle and provides a good base for exploring the attractions in the area.

1 out of 10 stars (1 vote)
Macduff

Macduff

Situated between Elgin and Fraserburgh, Macduff lies at the edge of a small bay where the River Deveron runs into the Moray Firth. Macduff is best known for Duff House, an art gallery and Macduff Aquarium where the underwater world is evident for all to see.

5 out of 10 stars (2 votes)
Old Aberdeen

Old Aberdeen

Old Aberdeen is an ancient town which now lies within the newer city of Aberdeen. Situated to the north of the city, the area known as Old Aberdeen is now home to the University of Aberdeen though the campus still welcomes visitors.

Pennan

Pennan

A typical village to be found on Aberdeenshire's northern coast, Pennan like her neighbours Crovie and Gadenstown, straddles a narrow strip of land between sea and cliff. Thought by some to the most attractive village in the area, Pennan is certainly the most famous for its role in the film Local Hero

Peterhead

Peterhead

The most easterly town in Scotland, Peterhead is also the largest white fishing port to be found in Europe. Known to locals as the "Bloo-Toon", Peterhead was also the landing point for the Pretender.

8 out of 10 stars (5 votes)
Portsoy

Portsoy

Traditionally a fishing village, Portsoy is lovely. It is built around a 17th century harbour and is best known for Portsoy marble. With its restored merchants' houses and narrow streets, Portsoy is worth visiting simply to absorb its wonderful atmosphere.

Stonehaven

Stonehaven

Situated just 16 miles south of Aberdeen off the A90, Stonehaven was once a thriving fishing port but since the decline of the fishing industry has reinvented itself as a popular destination for sailing and diving.

10 out of 10 stars (2 votes)
Tarland

Tarland

Situated in Royal Deeside, Tarland lies just a short distance from one of the most beautiful views in Scotland commonly known as the Queen's View. The village is a great base for excursions into the Cairngorms National Park and is also in the immediate vicinity of Tomnaverie Stone Circle and the Culsh Souterrain.

4 out of 10 stars (2 votes)


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